SNAPPED – OUR LATEST EVENT!

Have a go at our new photographic competition.
see below for details.

Mundaring and Hills Historical Society and Shire of Mundaring are asking people for any photographs relating to the Shire of Mundaring prior to the year 2000. Photographs must be original and comply with the terms and conditions of the project. A panel of two judges will choose the winner of the Open Award. This panel will consist of a representative from the MHHS and a representative from the Shire of Mundaring.

Entries mush be submitted via the Shire of Mundaring Libraries webpage:

https:www.mundaring.wa.gov.au/YourCommunity/ShireLibraries

BRAIN OVERLOAD!

Do you sometimes feel that you are trying to absorb too much information at once?

Went to a fabulous session with Anna Hall from Hancock Creative yesterday. Anna was telling us about the various social media outlets and which ones are read by the different age groups. I have been told for over a year now, that Facebook is passe, and mostly used by the over 65s. Instagram and Snapchat are the go for the younger set.

Whether this is right or wrong, we need to think about the way that we (as an organisation), are using social media. Engaging the readers and not educating them. Don’t get me wrong, there is a place for education but it needs to be done in an engaging manner.

Watch this space to see if I can practice what I preach!!

INSTAGRAM HERE WE COME

We were lucky enough to meet with a new member 2 weeks ago and he fabulously taught us how to use instagram. He peaked out interest and we were offered further tutoring through our Chamber of Commerce.

Learnt heaps, with lots more to know. I can’t wait to have another session with Kasia McNaught from Perth Social Media. She is a social media manager and coach and we now have a name tag that you can point your phone and it will take you to our instagram account.

Here it is:

WOW HOW EXCITING!!

RAILWAY HOTELS THROUGHOUT AUSTRALIA

Librarian Ginetta with Author Scott Whitaker at his book launch on the 8th August

Author Scott Whitaker with volunteers and staff from Mundaring and Hills Historical Society

The audience was enthralled as Scott entertained them with tails of Hotels in Australia that were once named Railway. Due to the importance of the railway line in most places, especially country towns, one of the first places of business was the local hotel. The most popular name for these hotels was Railway. For various reasons, the name did not necessarily stick and was sometimes changed.

Scott has written his fourth book, which includes Western Australia, South Australia, Tasmania and the Northern Territory. All books are very interesting and worth a read. Use this link to find out how to buy one. www.railwayhotelsofaustralia.com.au

OUR BIRTHDAY PARTY

Our birthday cake. Yummy!!
Founding member Jeff Murray and President Dr Fiona Bush

What a great day we had on Saturday! We were lucky to have several of our founding members to help us celebrate this occasion. If it wasn’t for their tenacious attitude towards saving the history of our Shire, we would not be here. These courageous people saved the old school, built in 1907, from demolition and managed to get funds to restore the building. Half of the building became our Museum, which we share with the Visitor Centre.

From little things, big things grow. At the office of the Historical Society, (Mundaring Stationmaster’s House, Jacoby Street Mundaring), we hold over 7,000 records pertaining to the history of Mundaring and are the “go to” place to find out how Mundaring evolved. Not only that, we have an amazing Museum. The current exhibition is about to change, so race in to see what we have on show. The next exhibition is part of the “What on Earth” collaboration with Mundaring Arts Centre and others. Our Exhibition will be called “Bush Bounty”

The open day for “What on Earth” is to be held on the 29th September at the Mundaring Arts Centre, Mundaring Hall, Mundaring Stationmaster’s House with a wildflower trail to Mundaring Sharing in Craigie House.

Keep checking this blog and our facebook page for more details.

OOPS nearly forgot. WE ARE ON INSTAGRAM. Take a look, we are moving with the times and are taking baby steps into the world of technology.

Not quite AI and Robots just yet, but watch this space!

CHILDREN’S GAMES THROUGHOUT THE AGES

I thought the Yoyo was a relatively new toy, around the 1940s or 1950s. It is believed that the yo-yo most likely originated in China. The first historical mention of the yo-yo, however, was from Greece in the year 500 B.C. These ancient toys were made out of wood, metal, or painted terra cotta disks and called just that, a disc. It is also thought that the name originates from the words “come- come”. Which makes sense in some way.

Pictures drawn on vases and plates show Yoyos being used in very early times.

Love/Sweetheart Token

Back of Love Token

Perth Hills detectorist and history enthusiast Rhys Hall has recently unearthed an artefact with links to one of Western Australia’s earliest and most influential settlers. Rhys, and his son Jack, were metal detecting on private property with the owner’s consent, in a rural area near Perth when he found what appears to be a ‘love token’ or ‘sweetheart token’.

Front of Love Token

The token bears the words S. STANLEY PARKER 1837. The letters are stamped on a 1797 Cartwheel Penny. The effigy of King George III has been rubbed off the coin but the cartwheel chariot design and some letters are visible.

The token is reminiscent of well documented convict ‘love tokens’. However, convicts did not arrive in WA until 1849.

Stephen Stanley Parker was born in 1817 and came to WA with his family in 1830 and is therefore amongst some of the State’s earliest settlers. He married in 1844 and farmed in York. In 1859 he erected a steam flour mill in that town. In 1882 he moved to Perth and served on the Legislative Council for 8 years. His good relations with local Aborigines saw him become a member of the Aboriginal Protection Board. At his death in 1904 the Western Mail (5 March) recorded that ‘he was esteemed as one of the prominent men of the country’.

Judge Stephen Henry Parker

Parkerville, in the Perth Hills, is named after his son, Stephen Henry Parker,(above) who became a Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

The token has important historical and research value. It is highly likely it was made by Stephen Parker when he was 20 years old.

The artefact can be added to a growing list of exciting finds being made by metal detectorists in Western Australia and further strengthens Heritage Detection Australia’s calls for the introduction of a Portable Antiquities Scheme.

References – heritagedetection.wordpress.com

Western Mail 5 March 1904

W B Kimberley. History of Western Australia